Hatfield Law Office

Bribery is defined as the act of offering or extending compensation to an individual or entity with the intention of swaying their actions, decisions or opinions. This compensation can be in the form of money, goods or favors.

We encourage you to contact us today for a free case evaluation by calling 812-422-0222

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Benefits of Hiring Hatfield Law for Bribery cases

Our attorneys have encountered all kinds of cases, from bribery involving business contacts to those offered with the intention of altering witness testimonies. The vast experience of our attorneys at Hatfield Law means that we are able to investigate your case and advise you on how to obtain the best result. Whether you have been accused of bribery or have been offered a bribe, we can navigate the complex legal proceedings while protecting your best interests.

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About Bribery Cases

IC 35-44.1-1-2

Sec. 2 . (a) A person who:
  • (1) confers, offers, or agrees to confer on a public servant, either before or after the public servant becomes appointed, elected, or qualified, any property, except property the public servant is authorized by law to accept, with intent to control the performance of an act related to the employment or function of the public servant or because of any official act performed or to be performed by the public servant, former public servant, or person selected to be a public servant;
  • (2) being a public servant, solicits, accepts, or agrees to accept, either before or after the person becomes appointed, elected, or qualified, any property, except property the person is authorized by law to accept, with intent to control the performance of an act related to the person’s employment or function as a public servant;
  • (3) confers, offers, or agrees to confer on a person any property, except property the person is authorized by law to accept, with intent to cause that person to control the performance of an act related to the employment or function of a public servant;
  • (4) solicits, accepts, or agrees to accept any property, except property the person is authorized by law to accept, with intent to control the performance of an act related to the employment or function of a public servant;
  • (5) confers, offers, or agrees to confer any property on a person participating or officiating in, or connected with, an athletic contest, sporting event, or exhibition, with intent that the person will fail to use the person’s best efforts in connection with that contest, event, or exhibition;
  • (6) being a person participating in, officiating in, or connected with an athletic contest, sporting event, or exhibition, solicits, accepts, or agrees to accept any property with intent that the person will fail to use the person’s best efforts in connection with that contest, event, or exhibition;
  • (7) being a witness or informant in an official proceeding or investigation, solicits, accepts, or agrees to accept any property, with intent to:
  • (a) withhold any testimony, information, document, or thing;
  • (b) avoid legal process summoning the person to testify or supply evidence;  or
  • (c) absent the person from the proceeding or investigation to which the person has been legally summoned;
  • (8) confers, offers, or agrees to confer any property on a witness or informant in an official proceeding or investigation, with intent that the witness or informant:
  • (a) withhold any testimony, information, document, or thing;
  • (b) avoid legal process summoning the witness or informant to testify or supply evidence;  or
  • (c) absent himself or herself from any proceeding or investigation to which the witness or informant has been legally summoned;  or
  • (9) confers or offers or agrees to confer any property on an individual for:
  • (a) casting a ballot or refraining from casting a ballot;  or
  • (b) voting for a political party, for a candidate, or for or against a public question; in an election described in IC 3-5-1-2 or at a convention of a political party authorized under IC 3; commits bribery, a Level 5 felony.
(B) It is not a defense that the person whom the accused person sought to control was not qualified to act in the desired way.

Bribery can occur between individuals and entities. Common kinds of bribery cases involve:

  • Public Officers: Bribes can be made to or by public officers. Bribes can be given to public officers to solicit them to use their position to effect a change in the perpetrator’s best interests.
  • Witnesses: Bribing a witness to change their testimony or accepting such a bribe is illegal. Depending on the value of this bribe and the circumstances of the case, consequences can include significant fines and jailtime.
  • Foreign officials: It is illegal for American companies to bribe foreign government officials with the intention to land or maintain business contacts.
  • Bank employees: Offering a bribe to a bank representative or accepting one can bring with it dire consequences. Due to the nature of their jobs, bank employees are thrust in a position of great responsibility daily, making them vulnerable to illicit offers.
  • Sports officials: Referees or other sports officials who accept a bribe in exchange for “fixing” the results of an event can be charged alongside the person who offered the bribe.
  • Conspiracies: Even if no bribery has been carried out, being involved in a conspiracy with the intention to commit bribery is a crime. In some cases, the accused can be charged with both bribery and conspiring to commit bribery.
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Why Hire Hatfield Law for Bribery Cases?

At Hatfield Law, we understand the fear and unease that can come with being accused of bribery. Living under this shadow can result in great emotional turmoil and it can feel like you have nowhere to turn to. Building a defense will require a thorough review of the facts and investigation. Our experience in prosecution and defense will help provide the best result when facing criminal charges. When you engage our services, you can trust our attorneys to handle your case with the highest level of professionalism and sensitivity.

If you want to schedule a free consultation with one of our bribery attorneys, feel free to contact us now. You can call Hatfield Law at 812-422-0222 or send an email to ryan@hatfieldlaw.com or david@hatfieldlaw.com.

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